Government Budgets

Every line item of a government budget must be an expenditure necessary to achieving the goals of the organization (Menifield, 2009). The governmental budgetary process provides transparency to the economic demands of the organization allowing for oversight by the people directly and by committees of elected officials dedicated to fiscal responsibility. It is this fiscal responsibility that ensures government spending is controlled and necessary for the purposes of government.

As Menifield (2009) points out, there are four dominant areas of concern, typically, when addressing governmental impact: political, tax, demographic, and administrative. Within each of these areas of concerns, aspects of efficiency, effectiveness, and equity must be addressed. While political concerns are more about the soundness of the overall plan, other concerns are more focused on specific aspects of the plan, such as who will be impacted and how

The budget process is the government’s means of allocating funds to departments within its jurisdiction in order to perform efficiently and effectively. The transparency of this process allows the people to offer criticism and promote their values and views on the process. This is important to ensure that people understand the necessity of each expenditure.

Though there are few people that pay attention to every aspect of the budget process, there are programs, usually expensive ones, that empassion people towards action in the way of participation in the process. Politicians should envision and anticipate many of the questions and concerns that the public might have for any program that they are seeking to funding. By being prepared, politicians will serve their constituency well by allaying fears and providing information.


Menifield, C. E. (2009). The basics of public budgeting and financial management: A handbook for academics and practitioners. Lanham, MD: University Press of America.